Books

Machete Season

Machete Season
Personal testimonies by the killers from the 1994 Rwanda genocide.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0056IBGGS/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

Asylum Denied: A Refugee's Struggle for Safety in America

Asylum Denied: A Refugee's Struggle for Safety in America
"Asylum Denied is the gripping story of political refugee David Ngaruri Kenney's harrowing odyssey through the world of immigration processing in the United States. Kenney, while living in his native Kenya, led a boycott to protest his government's treatment of his fellow farmers. He was subsequently arrested and taken into the forest to be executed. This book, told by Kenney and his lawyer Philip G. Schrag from Kenney's own perspective, tells of his near-murder, imprisonment, and torture in Kenya; his remarkable escape to the United States; and the obstacle course of ordeals and proceedings he faced as U.S. government agencies sought to deport him to Kenya. A story of courage, love, perseverance, and legal strategy, Asylum Denied brings to life the human costs associated with our immigration laws and suggests reforms that are desperately needed to help other victims of human rights violations. "
http://www.ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=9780520261594

Being Luis: A Chilean Life

Being Luis: A Chilean Life
"A voice for those who were silenced.This is a powerful account of a life that reflects recent Chilean history from the 1960s to the present though the author's extraordinary personal experiences. It recounts his magical, sometimes harsh, childhood, his development as a left-wing activist, his arrest and torture by the military regime and eventual exile to England.It is a story of love and survival in a time when the young were prepared to sacrifice everything, including their lives, for a better future. When ordinary people did great things and dared to dream great dreams. Uplifting, at times devastating, this story will move everyone who reads it. It speaks for a lost generation who paid the ultimate price for their ideals."
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006WV3CHO/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

Throwing Stones at the Moon: Narratives from Colombians Displaced by Violence

Throwing Stones at the Moon: Narratives from Colombians Displaced by Violence
"For nearly five decades, Colombia has been embroiled in internal armed conflict among guerrilla groups, paramilitary militias, and the country’s own military. Civilians in Colombia face a range of abuses from all sides, including killings, disappearances and rape—and more than four million have been forced to flee their homes. The oral histories in Throwing Stones at the Moon describe the most widespread of Colombia’s human rights crises: forced displacement. Speakers recount life before displacement, the reasons for their flight, and their struggle to rebuild their lives." 
http://voiceofwitness.org/books/colombia/

Meteor of War: The John Brown Story

Meteor of War: The John Brown Story
"Few men in American history have been at once as glorified and maligned as John Brown. From his attack of the federal arsenal at Harper's Ferry, Virginia, in October 1859, as part of a scheme to free the slaves, Brown has been called a saint and sinner, rogue and redeemer, martyr and madman. Brown rebelled against the American government, and he murdered men in Kansas in order to end the murderous institution of slavery. He denounced war, but made war on his government in order to end an existing war for slavery.

This anthology, which presents Brown's writings and diverse responses to his life and raid, offers a lens through which to analyze these tensions and contradictions. Extensive introductions to every source offer a close reading of language and provide full historical and biographical background. An introduction to the book traces Brown's changing image across time -- a "John Brown Cycle." An afterword considers the possible futures of the John Brown mythology. "
http://scholar.harvard.edu/jstauffer/publications/meteor-war-john-brown-story

Listening for a Change: Oral Testimony and Community Development

Listening for a Change: Oral Testimony and Community Development
""The aid world has done too much talking and not enough listening. "Participation" may be the fashionable concept in development circles, but how true is it in practice? The voices of ordinary people, the supposed beneficiaries, are still rarely heard." "Listening for a Change is a guide to collecting, interpreting and using the oral testimony of the people on whose actions and commitment development ultimately depends. The aim is to help development workers improve their listening and learning skills, and value the knowledge, experience, culture and priorities of local people." "The book briefly traces the revival of the oral history movement in the North, highlighting its relevance to development practice. With case-studies from all over the world, it explores the many different ways oral testimony can be used, by agencies and by communities themselves, to contribute to development and relief projects. It gives practical guidelines on methods of collection, as well as on recording, transcription and translation, and information on relevant organisations and publications. Finally, the limitations and ambiguities of oral evidence are explored, as well as ethical issues." "Packed with information pulled together for the first time, Listening for a Change challenges everyone in the aid world to listen to the awkwardly individual voices of the people at the heart of development. It is written for anyone working with communities in the collection and dissemination of first-hand testimony, but above all for policy makers, practitioners and students of social and economic development."
https://www.amazon.com/Listening-Change-Testimony-Community-Development/dp/0865713049

The Wisdom of Whores: Bureaucrats, Brothels, and the Business of AIDS

The Wisdom of Whores: Bureaucrats, Brothels, and the Business of AIDS
"As an epidemiologist researching AIDS, Elizabeth Pisani has been involved with international efforts to halt the disease for fourteen years. With swashbuckling wit, fierce honesty, and more than a little political incorrectness, she dishes on herself and her colleagues as they try to prod reluctant governments to fund HIV prevention for the people who need it most: drug injectors, gay men, sex workers, and johns. With verve and clarity, Pisani shows the general reader how her profession really works; how easy it is to draw wrong conclusions from “objective” data; and, shockingly, how much money is spent so very badly."
http://www.wisdomofwhores.com/

The Marketing of Rebellion: Insurgents, Media, and International Activism

The Marketing of Rebellion: Insurgents, Media, and International Activism
"How do a few Third World political movements become global causes célèbres, while most remain isolated? This book rejects dominant views that needy groups readily gain help from selfless nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Instead, they face a Darwinian struggle for scarce resources where support goes to the savviest, not the neediest. Examining Mexico's Zapatista rebels and Nigeria's Ogoni ethnic group, the book draws critical conclusions about social movements, NGOs, and "global civil society."
https://www.amazon.com/Marketing-Rebellion-Insurgents-International-Contentious/dp/0521607868

Human Rights Advocacy Stories

Human Rights Advocacy Stories
"This book tells the story of fifteen human rights cases from around the world―including cases adjudicated by a court or commission as well as controversies decided outside the courthouse. The cases illustrate key themes, including: the development of human rights norms and the work of human rights organizations; the function of individual and collective identities in human rights struggles; the role of international criminal norms in protecting human rights; globalization, foreign policy, and the economy; and human rights in a world at war. By making real the stories of collective action behind human rights advocacy, legal norms, and enforcement mechanisms, Human Rights Advocacy Stories illustrates the dynamic interactions between advocacy and legal doctrine."
https://www.amazon.com/Human-Rights-Advocacy-Stories-Law/dp/1599411997

The Death of Josseline: Immigration Stories from the Arizona-Mexico Borderlands

The Death of Josseline: Immigration Stories from the Arizona-Mexico Borderlands
Dispatches from Arizona, “the front line of a massive human migration”including the voices of migrants, Border Patrol, ranchers, activists, and others

For the last decade, Margaret Regan has reported on the escalating chaos along the Arizona-Mexico border, ground zero for immigration since 2000. Undocumented migrants cross into Arizona in overwhelming numbers, a state whose anti-immigrant laws are the most stringent in the nation. And Arizona has the highest number of migrant deaths. Fourteen-year-old Josseline, a young girl from El Salvador who was left to die alone on the migrant trail, was just one of thousands to perish in its deserts and mountains.

"With a sweeping perspective and vivid on-the-ground reportage, Regan tells the stories of the people caught up in this international tragedy. Traveling back and forth across the border, she visits migrants stranded in Mexican shelters and rides shotgun with Border Patrol agents in Arizona, hiking with them for hours in the scorching desert; she camps out in the thorny wilderness with No More Deaths activists and meets with angry ranchers and vigilantes. Using Arizona as a microcosm, Regan explores a host of urgent issues: the border militarization that threatens the rights of U.S. citizens, the environmental damage wrought by the border wall, the desperation that compels migrants to come north, and the human tragedy of the unidentified dead in Arizona’s morgues."
http://www.beacon.org/The-Death-of-Josseline-P873.aspx

Detained and Deported: Stories of Immigrant Families Under Fire

Detained and Deported: Stories of Immigrant Families Under Fire
An intimate look at the people ensnared by the US detention and deportation system, the largest in the world
 
On a bright Phoenix morning, Elena Santiago opened her door to find her house surrounded by a platoon of federal immigration agents. Her children screamed as the officers handcuffed her and drove her away. Within hours, she was deported to the rough border town of Nogales, Sonora, with nothing but the clothes on her back. Her two-year-old daughter and fifteen-year-old son, both American citizens, were taken by the state of Arizona and consigned to foster care. Their mother’s only offense: living undocumented in the United States.
Immigrants like Elena, who’ve lived in the United States for years, are being detained and deported at unprecedented rates. Thousands languish in detention centers—often torn from their families—for months or even years. Deportees are returned to violent Central American nations or unceremoniously dropped off in dangerous Mexican border towns. Despite the dangers of the desert crossing, many immigrants will slip across the border again, stopping at nothing to get home to their children.
Drawing on years of reporting in the Arizona-Mexico borderlands, journalist Margaret Regan tells their poignant stories. Inside the massive Eloy Detention Center, a for-profit private prison in Arizona, she meets detainee Yolanda Fontes, a mother separated from her three small children. In a Nogales soup kitchen, deportee Gustavo Sanchez, a young father who’d lived in Phoenix since the age of eight, agonizes about the risks of the journey back.
Regan demonstrates how increasingly draconian detention and deportation policies have broadened police powerswhile enriching a private prison industry whose profits are derived from human sufferingShe also documents the rise of resistance, profiling activists and young immigrant “Dreamers” who are fighting for the rights of the undocumented.
Compelling and heart-wrenching, Detained and Deported offers a rare glimpse into the lives of people ensnared in America’s immigration dragnet.
http://www.beacon.org/Detained-and-Deported-P1086.aspx

Kalaupapa: A Collective Memory by Anwei Skinsnes Law

Kalaupapa: A Collective Memory by Anwei Skinsnes Law
Between 1866 and 1969, an estimated 8,000 individuals—at least 90 percent of whom were Native Hawaiians—were sent to Molokai’s remote Kalaupapa peninsula because they were believed to have leprosy. Unwilling to accept the loss of their families, homes, and citizenship, these individuals ensured they would be accorded their rightful place in history. They left a powerful testimony of their lives in the form of letters, petitions, music, memoirs, and oral history interviews. Kalaupapa combines more than 200 hours of interviews with archival documents, including over 300 letters and petitions written by the earliest residents translated from Hawaiian.

It has long been assumed that those sent to Kalaupapa were unconcerned with the world they were forced to leave behind. The present work shows that residents remained actively interested and involved in life beyond Kalaupapa. They petitioned the Hawaii Legislative Assembly in 1874, seeking justice. They fervently supported Queen Liliuokalani and the Hawaiian Kingdom prior to annexation and contributed to the relief effort in Europe following World War I. In 1997 Kalaupapa residents advocated at the United Nations together with people affected by leprosy from around the world.

This book presents at long last the story of Kalaupapa as told by its people.
http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/p-8609-9780824836368.aspx

Not My Turn to Die: Memoirs of a Broken Childhood in Bosnia by Savo Heleta

Not My Turn to Die: Memoirs of a Broken Childhood in Bosnia by Savo Heleta
"In 1992, Savo Heleta was a young Serbian boy enjoying an idyllic, peaceful childhood in Gorazde, a primarily Muslim city in Bosnia. At the age of just thirteen, Savo's life was turned upside down as war broke out. When Bosnian Serbs attacked the city, Savo and his family became objects of suspicion overnight. Through the next two years, they endured treatment that no human being should ever be subjected to. Their lives were threatened, they were shot at, terrorised, put in a detention camp, starved and eventually stripped of everything they owned.But after two long years Savo and his family managed to escape. And then the real transformation took place. From his childhood before the war to his internment and eventual freedom, we follow Savo's emotional journey from a young teenager seeking retribution to a peaceseeking crusader seeking healing and reconciliation. At once powerful and elegiac, "Not My Turn to Die" offers a unique look at a conflict that continues to compel and enlighten us."
https://www.amazon.com/Not-My-Turn-Die-Childhood/dp/0814401651

The Soft Vengeance of a Freedom Fighter by Albie Sachs

The Soft Vengeance of a Freedom Fighter by Albie Sachs
"On April 7, 1988, Albie Sachs, an activist South African lawyer and a leading member of the ANC, was car-bombed in Maputo, the capital of Mozambique, by agents of South Africa’s security forces. His right arm was blown off, and he lost sight in one eye. This intimate and moving account of his recovery traces the gradual recuperation of his broken body and his triumphant reentry into the world, where his dream of soft vengeance was realized with the achievement of democracy in South Africa. This book captures the spirit of a remarkable man: his enormous optimism, his commitment to social justice, and his joyous wonder at the life that surrounds him. A new preface and epilogue reflect on the making of Abby Ginzberg’s documentary film titled Soft Vengeance: Albie Sachs and the New South Africa. (For information about the film, see www.softvengeancefilm.org.)"
http://www.ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=9780520283626

Witnessing Australian Stories: History, Testimony, and Memory in Contemporary Culture

Witnessing Australian Stories: History, Testimony, and Memory in Contemporary Culture
"This book is about how Australians have responded to stories about suffering and injustice in Australia, presented in a range of public media, including literature, history, films, and television. Those who have responded are both ordinary and prominent Australians—politicians, writers, and scholars. All have sought to come to terms with Australia’s history by responding empathetically to stories of its marginalized citizens.

Drawing upon international scholarship on collective memory, public history, testimony, and witnessing, this book represents a cultural history of contemporary Australia. It examines the forms of witnessing that dominated Australian public culture at the turn of the millennium. Since the late 1980s, witnessing has developed in Australia in response to the increasingly audible voices of indigenous peoples, migrants, and more recently, asylum seekers. As these voices became public, they posed a challenge not only to scholars and politicians, but also, most importantly, to ordinary citizens.

When former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd delivered his historic apology to Australia’s indigenous peoples in February 2008, he performed an act of collective witnessing that affirmed the testimony and experiences of Aboriginal Australians. The phenomenon of witnessing became crucial, not only to the recognition and reparation of past injustices, but to efforts to create a more cosmopolitan Australia in the present. This is a vital addition to Transaction’s critically acclaimed Memory and Narrative series."
http://www.transactionpub.com/title/Witnessing-Australian-Stories-978-1-4128-5158-9.html