NOTE: these are videos that are made up mostly of human rights testimonials, for other human rights videos, click See All Human Rights Videos

Videos

Unchained Memories (Readings from the Slave Narratives)

Unchained Memories (Readings from the Slave Narratives)
"Unchained Memories is a 2003 documentary film about the stories of former slaves interviewed during the 1930s as part of the Federal Writers' Project and preserved in the WPA Slave Narrative Collection. This HBO film interpretation directed by Ed Bell and Thomas Lennon is a compilation of slave narratives, narrated by actors, emulating the original conversation with the interviewer. The slave narratives may be the most accurate in terms of the everyday activities of the enslaved, serving as personal memoirs of more than two thousand former slaves. The documentary depicts the emotions of the slaves and what they endured. The "Master" had the opportunity to sell, trade, or kill the enslaved, for retribution should one slave not obey. Narrated by: Whoopi Goldberg"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xjjb-7R02Rw

Oral Histories From Segregated Evansville, IN in the 1960s

Oral Histories From Segregated Evansville, IN in the 1960s
"Four African-Americans from the Midwest city recall life in segregation before the civil rights movement in the mid-1960s. They couldn't eat in white-owned restaurants and attended separate (and unequal) schools. This video was part of the educational pre-show for the play, "Jubilee in the Rear View Mirror," about the voting rights struggle that opened in 2012 (www.jubileeplay.com) To emphasize the racial divide of the time, the theater was roped off into separate white and colored areas. Patrons were issued tickets at random (not by race) and sat in the appropriate W and C sections. Before pressure was brought to bear, blacks in many communities were not allowed to try on new shoes. Salesmen traced the edges of their old shoes onto butcher paper and fetched an approximate fit from inventory."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vTYyLqvYVQ

LGBT Seniors Tell Their Stories | LA LGBT Center

LGBT Seniors Tell Their Stories | LA LGBT Center
An Oral History is an ongoing project of the Los Angeles LGBT Center's Senior Services Department. This short film captures the perspective of eleven LGBT seniors in Los Angeles who came of age during a time in which imprisonment, daily discrimination, physical violence and abuse were commonplace. Exemplifying elegant survival, the individuals you will meet in An Oral History, made the community we have today possible. From the "Daughters of Bilitis" and "Mattachine Society" to the marches led by Frank Kameny and Barbara Gittings, the history of the LGBT movement has often been forgotten, overlooked or ignored. This is an attempt to give voice to and shine the light on the stories and lives of these individuals. FOLLOW THE LOS ANGELES LGBT CENTER ON SOCIAL MEDIA: YouTube (Subscribe): https://goo.gl/9EgsoJ Twitter: https://twitter.com/LALGBTCenter Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LALGBTCenter Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/LALGBTCenter/ Snapchat: LALGBTCenter
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDOdv792rBA

Australian Aboriginal culture - Durrurrnga family oral history project

Australian Aboriginal culture - Durrurrnga family oral history project
"This is Dick Yambal Durrurrnga, elder and leader of the Birritjama people from Guruwana country. Yambal explains to his sons and grandsons gathered around him the intimate details of Badurru (the Milky Way or a Hollow Log Coffin), as told to him by his father and grandfather. He wants this information to be kept alive for the Durrurrnga family, but also as a historical document which can be used in the future should any disputes arise around Badurru or land belonging to the Durrurrnga people. The next day, Yambal teaches the children a little about manikay and how Birritjama clan songs are sung, the clapstick patterning, the dance moves, the yidaki rhythms..."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ucs03roChhk

Navajo Oral History Project (2009) Wilson Aronilth - Living History

Navajo Oral History Project (2009) Wilson Aronilth - Living History
"This documentary film was researched, photographed, edited and produced by students of Winona State University (Winona, Minnesota) and Diné College (Tsaile, Arizona, Navajo Nation) during summer 2009. It contains stories Dr. WIlson Aronilth Jr. of Tsaile, Arizona, told the students during several hours of interviews about his life. This documentary film is archived at the Navajo Nation Museum, Navajo Nation Library, Winona State University Library, and Diné College Library, and at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of the American Indian. The film is part of the Navajo Oral History project, a multi-year collaboration between the Winona State University Mass Communication Department and Diné College, the official Tribal College of the Navajo Nation."
https://vimeo.com/101748344

Building Hope: The CDC Oral History Project

Building Hope: The CDC Oral History Project
"Community development corporations (CDCs) struggle to address problems of social, economic, and physical distress in low and moderate-income communities throughout the United States. Their fundamental mission is to build community leadership and empower low-income people to take charge of their future. Despite great adversity, the field of community development has matured and grown tremendously over the years. The Pratt Center for Community Development (prattcenter.net ) received the support and encouragement of the Ford Foundation to initiate an Oral History Project that would capture the rich history of the CDC movement from the perspective of some of its founding leaders. The documentary draws from interviews with the founders, leaders and supporters of 19 CDCs across the country, which are available to researchers, scholars and other interested individuals as part of the permanent collection at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. While the CDCs in the film vary in terms of their goals and strategies for revitalizing the communities they serve, these CDCs share common roots in the civil rights and antipoverty movements of the 1960s. The Pratt Center and Vanguard Films drew upon the CDC Oral History Project interviews to produce Building Hope, a one-hour video documentary that aired nationwide on PBS in April of 1994. Major funding for the CDC Oral History Project and Building Hope was provided by The Ford Foundation. Additional funding provided by: Fannie Mae Foundation, Prudential Foundation, and the Victoria Foundation. The CDC Oral History Project is dedicated to the memory of Charles Bannerman, Bernard McDonald, Ted Watkins and other leaders of the movement who are no longer with us."
https://vimeo.com/5977553

Daniel Kerr, "How Oral History Can Facilitate Movement Building"

Daniel Kerr,
"Daniel Kerr, a professor of history at American University, discusses research he conducted with the Cleveland Homeless Oral History Project where he has interviewed close to 200 homeless people and has facilitated dozens of workshops and meetings in the shelters and drop-in centers of Cleveland, Ohio. Focusing on his work with the project, Kerr examines how oral history research can move beyond professional and academic aims and actively facilitate social change."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHRkPuJfasg

Out of Sight, Out of Mind - The Story of Sam Mandez

Sam Mandez has been in solitary confinement since 1997. He was one of 75 prisoners (2013) in Colorado's prisons who suffers from severe mental illness. The short film is a compilation of testimonies describing solitary confinement and it's impact on the mental health of prisoners. "The best way I can describe solitary confinement is being buried alive... You're trapped inside your head almost, like being in a coma." - Ryan Pettigrew
https://vimeo.com/78840078

Interview with Recently Freed Undocumented Immigrant Detainees

Personal interview with recently freed undocumented immigrants, Erica Rodriquez and her 17 year old son, Christian. After being realized from the detention center, she and her son highlight in detail about her trip from El Salvado to the U.S. She talks about crossing the river, being held in something they call the “Ice Box” for 3 days before being transfered to something they call the “Dog House” in Texas (due to the chained fences around the facility.” She was told she would not be separated from her family; however, she was. They lost weight, because they were too sad to eat and did not experience sunlight. They were there for a month and 8 days.
https://www.democracynow.org/2015/3/25/private_prisons_for_immigrant_families_grow

Veena

Very brief video about the life of a transwoman named Veena in India. Veena has worked on helping her community during tough times and being a strong leader whose desire is to help everyone.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fMk564lb0z8

Somalia: 'People are dying..there's no water

This CNN story provides a video and story for one family victimized by the drought and famine in Somalia. The article also includes discussion of the current state and problems of Somalia. McKenzie, David, and Brent Swails. "Somalia: 'People are dying..there's no water'" CNN. Cable News Network, 08 Mar. 2017. Web. 18 Apr. 2017. .
http://www.cnn.com/2017/03/07/africa/somalia-famine-united-nations/